General Heartbreak

We met 2 years ago at ConArtist when you had just finished school. Before then, I had seen a couple of your paintings in an exhibition at CA and I was struck by your use of surrealistic, pop iconography within the faded, pastel context of Asian-American imagery seen frequently throughout Chinatown.

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Dapper Bruce Lafitte at Fierman Gallery

“Kingpin of the Antpin” is an exhibition of drawings by New Orleans-based artist Dapper Bruce Lafitte. In this solo show of new work, Lafitte depicts the challenges of living in this significant southern city such as the socio-political consequences left by Hurricane Katrina.

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Constructing Paradise

There has been a long history of Western artists discovering and re-discovering the exotic. At the Austrian Cultural Forum New York, a remarkable cultural space in Midtown, the show “Constructing Paradise” examines the impulse to romanticize foreign cultures, landscapes, and points of view. Artists as well known as Paul Gauguin, Oskar Kokoschka, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Mickalene Thomas and Mark Dion are included.

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Hovering Above

Marisa Merz was 19 years old in 1945 when World War II ended.  America and its Allies had defeated the spread of Fascism that had grown throughout the two previous decades primarily in Italy and Germany.  

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Crossing a Porous Boundary: AM DeBrincat

Speculative Fiction, a solo show of paintings by AM DeBrincat now on view through March 27th at the Martin Art Gallery of Muhlenberg College, poses many thought-provoking questions.  The eleven works on display highlight the unique visual lexicon that DeBrincat has created: a mixed-media technique which combines painting with the manipulation of digital photography to underscore the complexity of identity in the Digital Age.

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Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965

“Inventing Downtown” at the Grey Art Gallery is a densely-packed, archival-based group show that charts the beginning of artist-run galleries following World War II.  The exhibition opens in 1952, a murky year when American Abstract Expressionism continued its decade-long mainstream popularity while gradually waning from public’s interest.  

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